Logic Pro 9 Arpeggiator Environment

Setting up the Arpeggiator in the Logic Pro 9 Environment can be done a couple of different ways. Using the mixer preserves the original recording. Although you will hear the arpeggiated notes you will not see them as individual events in the piano roll. The advantage here is that you can change the parameters of the arpeggiator (change 1/8 notes to 1/16, etc.) on the fly to experiment with the different parameters. If you use the Click & Ports method and cable the arpeggiator before the sequencer, everything recorded is arpeggiated and therefore printed to the track. The advantage of using this method is that the individual notes can be edited. If you don’t want all the notes to be in octaves then you can change them to thirds, fifths, or a combination of whatever. This also works well if you want to copy the lead arpeggiated track, alter a few notes, and make it the bass track. Cable switching is also employed to bypass the arpeggiator if it’s not desired when recording subsequent tracks. Both methods have advantages and disadvantages. You decide which works best in your project.

Bluey

An original song by Bob Sell recorded using Logic Pro X and Final Cut Pro X. In the choruses I take advantage of the Flex Pitch feature in Logic Pro X to create vocal harmonies. I’ll be happy to create a tutorial on using Flex Pitch to create vocal harmony parts if anyone is interested. Please comment!

Music Production Studio